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      Welcome to the home page of The Hong Kong Anthropological Society, a scholarly association dedicated to broadening academic anthropology and its understanding by laypeople beyond the academe.  
             
Forthcoming Events
   

THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Gordon Mathews and Linessa Lin Dan

Will China Ever Have Its Own Barak Obama?
Reflections on the African and Arab Diaspora in Guangzhou

Thursday 20 November 2014, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

Guangzhou is today the most multi-cultural city in China, not least because of its large African and Arab populations. Many of them are long-term residents of the city, but unlike Europeans and Japanese, they often intend to stay in the city and make it their home, marrying Chinese and having children. But can they ever fully accepted, not as foreigners but as legitimate residents of China?

In this talk, we explore the relations between these Africans and Arabs and the Chinese residents of Guangzhou, looking at such areas as legal/illegal residence status, business relations and trust between Africans/Arabs and Chinese, religious belief and its complications, and romantic relations between Africans/Arabs and Chinese. We will not be able to answer the rhetorical question of our title, but we offer arguments for and against the prospect of a multicultural and global future China.

Gordon Mathews teaches anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.
Linessa Lin Dan is his Ph.D. student. Both spent 2013-2014 doing fieldwork in Guangzhou.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Jeanie Tsang

Re-interpretation of "Wise Mother": Japanese Expatriate Mothers in Hong Kong

Wednesday 3 December 2014, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

Expatriate Japanese women accompanying their husbands on overseas postings have been studied for the ways in which they, as a new international class, adopt to foreign societies and insure that their children are prepared for return into conservative middle class Japanese society. As the Japanese economy shifts resulting in the globalization of families and educational pathways, and as Japanese companies move further into Asia and China, however, new strategies for caring for their families and preparing their children have emerged. This study focuses on expatriate Japanese mothers living in Hong Kong and explores how they are far bolder and strategic than ever in using their overseas experience to negotiate their roles in the children's education, pursue their own careers and personal life, and how overseas experience continues to affect them after their return to Japan.

Jeanie Tsang is an M.Phil student in the Department of Japanese Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Jun Zhang

Driving for the Family: Ethical Negotiation in the Making of the Middle Class in Urban China

Wednesday 14 January 2014, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

This talk explores the centrality of family in the making of urban middle class through their experience with auto-mobility in contemporary China. "Middle class" is often taken for granted as a reference to individuals' class or social status in a similar manner in which cars are generally considered an icon of individual autonomy and freedom. This talk illustrates the ways in which the car and auto-mobility enable the middle class to imagine, redefine and practice proper domestic life. I argue that proper conduct of the self in relation to family is important for them to imagine their membership in the middle-class community. Meanwhile, their conduct coincides with the state's agenda that seeks to recreate itself by promoting the so-called traditional family values. Just as cars echo political ideology of liberal individualism in many western contexts, cars provide a material medium to articulate and practice family ethics and value that contribute to the legitimization of the state in contemporary China.

Jun Zhang teaches at the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences.

       
    WCAA
The HKAS is a member of the World Council of Anthropological Associations
 
       

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