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      Welcome to the home page of The Hong Kong Anthropological Society, a scholarly association dedicated to broadening academic anthropology and its understanding by laypeople beyond the academe.  
             
Forthcoming Events
   

THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Sharon Wong Wai-yee

The Awareness of Technological Choices: Chinese Elements Adopted by Khmer Ceramic Craftsmen in Angkor, Cambodia

Thursday 23 April 2015, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

Khmer ceramics unearthed in Angkor can be traced as cultural roots to provoke local awareness of local identities and traditions. However, Chinese influence is usually portrayed as a straightforward case of one-way cultural diffusion, especially how Chinese ceramic craftsmanship influenced the Khmers during the ninth to fourteenth centuries. In this talk, a concept of technological choices on the study of Chinese elements adopted by Khmer ceramic craftsmen in Angkor will shed light on our imagery of cross-cultural exchange in the past.

Sharon Wong Wai-yee is Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include historical archaeology, and China-Southeast Asian cultural interaction in pre-modern period. She was trained in archaeology and gained her PhD at the National University of Singapore and M.A. from the School of Archaeology and Museology in Peking University.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Rao Yichen

Coming of Age with "Internet Addiction": Institutional Encounters and Subject Formation of Chinese Youngsters

Thursday 28 May 2015, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

"Internet addiction" has been treated as a mental disorder in China since 2005. The past ten years have witnessed the rise and fall of a national campaign to "rescue" the 24 million "Internet addicts" in China. Some of them sat in an internet café for days or weeks without eating or drinking. Some committed suicide as a result of one quarrel after another with their parents. Some killed their parents as they "lost their sense" in the world on-line. Treatment camps for internet addiction were established across China under the mission of saving Chinese youths and their families. However, the media coverage of these institutions "disclosed" their "dark" and disruptive sides. Young people sent to these centers were said to have gone through a series of physical tortures - some were even trained to death. Based on three months' ethnographic fieldwork in a treatment camp based on different therapeutics, this talk gives an inquiry into the discipline and resistance, the institutional encounters and the subject formations of the youngsters who underwent the treatment of "internet addiction".

RAO Yichen is an Mphil student, Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Ho Cheuk-Yuet

Urban Housing Demolition and Rights Defense in Chongqing

Thursday 11 June 2015, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

In the past two decades, housing demolitions (拆迁) and property investments (买房) have become ubiquitous phenomena and an everyday topic of discussion for ordinary people in China. In this talk, I shall describe certain Chongqing urban dwellers' defiance of evictions and defense of their property rights. Drawing on my ethnographic studies between 2011-2013, which coincided with Secretary Bo Xilai's (薄熙来) peak of power and subsequent dismissal, I shall present several cases that depict how property investors (买房人) and nail householders (钉子户) contest real estate developers and demolition personnel for their alleged wrongdoings.

In this talk, I shall highlight how the notion of property rights are invoked and employed strategically by the various parties, animated variously by contrasting claims of need, desire, and self-interest. I suggest that private property rights are at once enabling and disabling when understood in the light of both the rigorous pursuit of well-being in a market economy and the contestation by those who resist forced eviction or the infringement of owners' rights.

Ho Cheuk-Yuet (PhD, U of Cambridge, 2014) is Honorary Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests include property rights, human rights, anthropology of finance, and anthropology of truth and apology.

       
    WCAA
The HKAS is a member of the World Council of Anthropological Associations
 
       

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