Welcome to the Anthropology Department
 
THE CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
 
 
             

FACULTY PROFILES (and representative publications)

Gordon Mathews (Professor, Ph.D. Cornell University) cmgordon@cuhk.edu.hk

Significant Publications

  • 2008. "Chungking Mansions: A Center of 'Low-End Globalization.'" Ethnology XLVI (2): 169-183.

  • 2008. Pursuits of Happiness: Well-Being in Anthropological Perspective, Gordon Mathews and Carolina Izquierdo, eds. London and New York: Berghahn. Wrote for this book the chapters "Anthropology, Happiness, and Well-Being," "Finding and Keeping a Purpose in Life: Well-Being and Ikigai in Japan and Elsewhere," and "Towards an Anthropology of Well-Being."

  • 2008. Kangju guojia rentong de xianggang: shi zhimin shidai de fuhezhe haishi quanqiuhua de xianqu [Hong Kong's Resistance to National Identity: Echo of a Colonial Past or Harbinger of a Globalized Future?] In Hao Zhidong, ed., Guojia rentong yu liang'an weilai [National Identity and the Future of Cross-Strait Relations]. Macau: University of Macau Press.? Pp. 123-140.

  • 2008. Hong Kong, China: Learning to Belong to a Nation. Gordon Mathews, Eric Kit-wai Ma and Tai-lok Lui. London and New York: Routledge.
  • 2007. "Cultural Identity in an Age of Globalization: Implications on Architecture."  In Sang Lee and Ruth Baumeister, eds., The Domestic and the Foreign in Architecture.  Rotterdam: 010 Publishers.
  • 2006. "Happiness and the Pursuit of a Life Worth Living: An Anthropological Approach." In Yew-kwang Ng and Lok Sang Ho, eds., Happiness and Public Policy. Hampshire, U.K.: Palgrave Macmillan. Pp. 147-168.
  • 2006. "If Anthropology is a Science, then the East-West Dichotomy is Irrelevant: Moving Towards a Global Anthropology." In J. Hendry and H. W. Wong, eds., Dismantling the East-West Dichotomy: Essays in Honour of Jan van Bremen. London and New York: Routledge. Pp. 183-188

  • 2005. "Context and Consciousness in the Practice of Transnationality." City and Society (American Anthropological Association/Society for Urban, National, Transnational, and Global Anthropology), vol. XVII, no. 1, pp. 35-48.

  • 2004. "Fence, Flavour, and Phantasm: Japanese Musicians and the Meanings of Japaneseness." Japanese Studies 24(3), Dec. 2004, pp. 335-349
  • 2004. "On the Tension Between Japanese and American Anthropological Depictions of Japan." In S. Yamashita, J. Bosco, and J. Eades, eds.,The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia. New York: Berghahn. Pp. 114-135
  • 2004. Japan's Changing Generations: Are Young People Creating a New Society? Gordon Mathews and Bruce White, eds. London and New York: RoutledgeCurzon. Wrote for this book the chapters "Introduction: Changing Generations in Japan Today," and "Seeking a Career, Finding a Job: How Young People Enter and Resist the Japanese World of Work." The latter chapter was reprinted in Modern Japanese Society and Culture. London: Routledge, 2007.
  • 2003. "Dangdai riben yishu wenhua yu rentong chuangsu" (Contemporary Artistic Culture and the Creation of Japanese Identity) Envisage (2): 140-170. Taipei: Communication Arts Research Institute.
  • 2002. "Can a Real Man Live For His Family? Ikigai and Masculinity in Today's Japan." In J. Roberson and N. Suzuki, eds., Men and Masculinities in Contemporary Japan: Dislocating the Salaryman Doxa. London and New York: Routledge Curzon, 2002.
  • 2002. "Review Essay: Japan's Alternative Modernity in a Globalizing World." American Anthropologist 104(3): 958-961
  • 2001. Consuming Hong Kong. Gordon Mathews and Lui Tai-lok, eds. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong Press. Wrote for this book the chapter "Cultural Identity and Consumption in Postcolonial Hong Kong."
  • 2001. "A Collision of Discourses: Japanese and Hong Kong Chinese During the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands Crisis." In H. Befu and S. Guichard-Anguis, eds., Globalizing Japan. London and New York: Routledge.
  • 2001. "Bunkateki bunmyaku kara mita ikigai" [The cultural context of what makes life worth living]. In Y. Takahashi and S. Wada, eds., Ikigai no shakaigaku [The sociology of what makes life worth living]. Tokyo: Kobundo.
  • 2000. Global Culture/Individual Identity: Searching for Home in the Cultural Supermarket. London and New York: Routledge. Translated into Brazilian Portuguese, 2002, and Polish, 2004.
  • 1998. "The Contemporary Meanings of Culture: On Why Hong Kong May Be the Most Exciting Place in the World in Which to do Anthropological Research." In S. Cheung, ed., On the South China Track: Perspectives on Anthropological Research. Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, Chinese University of Hong Kong.
  • 1997. "Heunggongyahn: On the Past, Present, and Future of Hong Kong Identity." Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, 29(3): 3-13. Reprinted in Hong Kong, International Library of Social Change in the Pacific, Aldershot U.K.: Ashgate, 2003 and in Narrating Hong Kong Culture and Identity. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 2003.
  • 1996. What Makes Life Worth Living? How Japanese and Americans Make Sense of Their Worlds. Berkeley: University of California Press. Translated into Japanese, 2001.
  • 1996. "Names and Identities in the Hong Kong Cultural Supermarket." Dialectical Anthropology 21(3,4): 399-419.
  • 1996. "The Stuff of Dreams, Fading: Ikigai and "the Japanese Self." Ethos 24(4): 718-747. Reprinted in Modern Japanese Society and Culture. London: Routledge, 2007.
  • 1996. "The Pursuit of a Life Worth Living in Japan and the United States." Ethnology XXXV(1): 51-62.

Current Research

  • The World in Chungking Mansions: How Low-end Globalization Works

  • Understanding Society Through Life After Death: Japan and Elsewhere

  • Learning to Belong to a Nation: Hong Kong in China and the World
  • Cultural Identity Between State and Market: Japan and Elsewhere
  • Well-Being and Meanings of Life in Anthropological Perspective
  • Thinking Through Theory: Making Anthropological Theory Relevant to Everyday Life
 

Copyright@2011. All Rights Reserved. Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.