Archive 2004
     
             
     

THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

JESSICA LAM

THE DREAM AND REALITY OF FLYING

15 Dec 2004 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

"This is absolutely not the uniform I longed for. It has no charm, no elegance!" exclaimed one my informants, revealing her frustration with her airline employer. Becoming a flight attendant is a dream for many young women. My informants, women from Japan and Britain, invested a great deal of time and money to prepare themselves, beautify, and improve their body shape to realize their dreams. But the reality was often disappointing. The talk will explore the women's experiences and consider why the profession remains highly appealing to young women.

Jessica Lam is currently an instructor at the Gender Studies Programme, the Chinese University of Hong Kong and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Tokyo. She has researched women's employment issues such as sexual harassment problems in Japanese companies. Ms. Lam has also taught courses on Hong Kong and Japanese women at the University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

DAVID M. HODSON

THE IMAGE OF THE POLICE: PC DIXON, SGT JOE FRIDAY, JACKIE CHAN AND THE OTHER USUAL SUSPECTS

24 Nov. 2004 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Few people have direct contact with the police or are the victims of crime. Most people's images of the police and levels of crime are formed by the way they are portrayed in the media. In this age of instant mass communications the street theatre of protest is an easy appetizer for the ever hungry media that caters to an expectant audience and panders to their prejudices and fear of crime. The speaker will address how the image of the police has developed over the years using examples from the U.K., the United States and Hong Kong.

From May 1999 to March 2004, Mr. Hodson was the founding Honorary Director of the Centre for Criminology at the University of Hong Kong where today he serves as a Fellow. In March 2001, he was appointed Visiting Professor at the Chinese People's Public Security University in Beijing. His career in the Hong Kong Police has spanned over 36 years including 20 years in command of specialist criminal investigation bureaus dealing with narcotics, criminal intelligence and organized crime.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Hing Chao

The Orechen Today: Problems and Issues of a Minority People in Northeastern China

27 Oct. 2004 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

The Orochen (Ch: E-lun-chun Nationality) live in the forested regions of north-eastern China, occupying the Greater and Lesser Khingan Ranges that stretch from Inner Mongolia to Heilongjiang province. With a population of around 8000, according to the most recent survey, they are the fifth smallest minority group in China. They have their own distinct language that belongs to the broader Manchu-Tungusic family, and share cultural affinities with a number of social groups in northeast Asia. They currently face problems such as loss of language, alienation from their own culture, dispossession of land, identity loss, and deforestation. The speaker will discuss these problems in his talk.

After obtaining a BA in philosophy from the University of Durham, Hing Chao spent a year studying Chinese Aesthetics at Peking University, and traveled extensively in northern China. In the past four years he has made numerous trips to the Orechen districts. Earlier this year, Chao established the Orochen Foundation to raise funds to help the Orechen preserve and perpetuate indigenous culture. He has also begun a project of recording Orochen folk songs, and is involved in experimental ways of presenting their music to modern, urban audiences.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr. Lui Tai-lok / Ma Kit-wai / Gordon Mathews

How Hong Kong People Are Learning to Belong to a Nation

27 Sept. 2004 Monday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Almost everyone in the world today has a sense of national identity, and takes that identity more or less for granted as "natural." But because of its colonial heritage this has not been the case in Hong Kong; since 1997, Hong Kong has politically been a part of China, but culturally has been much more ambivalent. How are Hong Kong people "learning to belong to a nation," like everyone else in the world? How and why are they resisting such a national identity? In this presentation, three noted scholars of Hong Kong present their ideas on this theme, in terms of Hong Kong's recent history, its mass media, and its education.

Dr. Lui Tai-lok, of the Dept. of Sociology, CUHK, has edited The Dynamics of Social Movement in Hong Kong; Dr. Ma Kit-wai, of the School of Journalism and Communication, CUHK, has written Culture, Politics and Television in Hong Kong; Dr. Gordon Mathews, of the Dept. of Anthropology, CUHK, has written Global Culture/Individual Identity: Searching for Home in the Cultural Supermarket. These three scholars are now writing a book together, entitled Learning to Belong to a Nation: Hong Kong in China and the World.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Prof. Michael DeGolyer

A New Look at Hong Kong Identity
29 June 2004 Tuesday

HKAS Annual General Meeting: 6: 30 p.m.
Prof. DeGolyer's Lecture: 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

"How can you govern a country with 1,500 different cheeses?" This question, famously asked of France, connected the diversity of French cuisine and taste with both its identity and politics. What of Hong Kong? Can cuisine, landform and tastes begin to explain what makes Hong Kong Chinese different from mainland Chinese in both their identity and politics? Until now, Hong Kong identity has been thought of in primarily cultural, political or economic terms, without looking at the more basic factors of everyday life. In this talk, inspired by the French historian Fernand Braudel, the well-known Hong Kong commentator Michael DeGolyer looks at Hong Kong identity in an absolutely new way.

Michael DeGolyer is Associate Professor of Government and International Studies at Hong Kong Baptist University and Director of the Hong Kong Transition Project, a multi-national, multi-university, multi-method longitudinal study of Hong Kong people's transition from British colonial subjects to Chinese SAR citizens. He writes a regular weekly column of public affairs commentary in The Standard.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr Jason Wordie

The Hong Kong Portuguese Community
3 June 2004 Thursday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

For almost four generations the Hong Kong Portuguese community played a vibrant role in Hong Kong life. They can be considered urban Hong Kong's first truly local community. Yet today their importance within Hong Kong society is largely forgotten. In this lecture, the speaker will trace this fascinating community evolution and development from its first beginnings in Macao through to the 1960s, and will explore the numerous traces that they have left behind in Hong Kong.

Dr. Jason Wordie is a local historian and writer, and an Honorary Research Associate at the Centre of Asian Studies, Hong Kong University. For some years he has been gathering material for a history of
the Hong Kong local Portuguese community.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr. Tik-sang Liu

Hong Kong's Popular Religion in Action
FILM SHOW AND MEET THE DIRECTOR

21 May 2004 Friday 6:30pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

People arrange temple festivals in Hong Kong villages to celebrate their patron deity's birthday, and purify their community through cosmic renewal. As an essential aspect of local culture, popular religion has a close relation with every aspect of people's daily life, and serves as a window for us to understand local Hong Kong culture and society. In his newly-made documentary video, "An Long: A Jiao Festival in a Hong Kong Coastal Village," Liu illustrates the dynamics of today's popular religion in Hong Kong.

Dr. Tik-sang Liu has taught in the Division of Humanities, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology since 1993. He received his graduate training in the University of Pittsburgh. The Tian Hou Cult in Hong Kong (2000) is one of his recent works on local religion and society in Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Prof. Ng Man Lun
�d�ӭ۱б�

Polyamory in Human History
On the Meanings and Morals of Loving More Than One

�H���v�W���կǷR
�W�L�@�ӷR�Q���D�w�P�N�q

4 May 2004 Tuesday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Can we love more than one partner? Is this moral or immoral? This talk will analyze this controversial topic within the history of human sexuality in different societies and cultures, and will discuss the broader human meanings and implications of sex, love, and marriage.

�ڭ̬O�_�i�H�h�R�@�өΥH�W����Q�H�o�X�G�D�w�ܡH�����y�|�q�L�H���ʷR���v�h���R�M�Q�׳o�ӴI��ij��ij�D�A�P���˵��{�檺�B�è�פΦh�������Y�A�Ǧ��Ϭ٩ʡB�R�αB�ê��N�q�C

Professor Emil Ng is working in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong. He is the Head of the Sex Clinic, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, and the Founding President of the Hong Kong Sex Education Association and the Asian Federation for Sexology . He received the Gold Medal Award in Sexology from the World Association for Sexology in 2003.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, CUHK
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Prof. Bob McKercher

Cultural Tourists
Who are they and what do they want?

6 April 2004 Tuesday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

The World Tourism Organization estimates that 37 percent of all international tourists are cultural tourists. Research conducted in Hong Kong shows that about 35 percent of all visitors participate in some form of cultural tourism. However, not all cultural tourists are the same: Cultural tourism, this lecture will reveal, is not what you think it is.

Dr Bob McKercher is an Associate Professor and Associate Head of the School of Hotel and Tourism Management at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He has recently completed a study of cultural tourism in Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY, CUHK
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Prof. Tamar Gordon

Global Villages: the Globalization of Ethnic Display

FILM SHOW / MEET THE DIRECTOR

16 March 2004 Tuesday 6:30pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Global Villages is a documentary film that explores ethnic theme parks in China and Japan, where official narratives of tradition are made into colorful dances and interactive routines. Global Villages captures the different ways in which globalization, development and identity are experienced by the people who live within these theme parks.

Dr Tamar Gordon is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Electronic Media, Arts and Communication at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research focuses on the comparative study of theme parks and their techniques of display and politics of ethnic representation. She also writes and teaches on the cultural analysis of contemporary religions.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

�� �� Dr Pun Ngai

����k�u������ʥг��g��

Tales from the Field: Chinese Migrant Women Workers

10 February 2004 Tuesday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

�����y�D�n�O���ɬ�s����k�u������ʥг��g��C�k�u������B�����M�ä�p���q�L�г���s�Q�׭z�M���c �C

��ݡA���~��۴��j�ǨȬw�ΫD�w��s�ǰ|�A�{��¾�󭻴��ޤj�Ǫ��|��Ǿdz��C��s����]�A�ʧO�B���ũM��Ƭ�s�C�ۧ@�� "Becoming Dagongmei: the politics of identity and difference in Reform China" (July, 1999) in The China Journal; "Opening a Minor Gene of Resistance in Reform China: Dream, Scream and Transgression in a Workplace" (Fall, 2000) in Positions; Made in China: Subject, Power and Resistance in a Global Workplace (forthcoming), Duke University Press.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr Ed Vickers

History Education and Identity Formation in Hong Kong

3 February 2004 Tuesday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This lecture relates changes in the history curriculum for secondary schools in Hong Kong to the political, social and cultural changes that Hong Kong has experienced over the past thirty years. The lecture will discuss the introduction of local history as a topic of instruction from the mid-1990s, and will draw comparisons between Hong Kong and Taiwan, where local history was also introduced into the curriculum during the past decade. More broadly it will explore how the teaching of history is linked to issues of identity in Hong Kong.

Dr Ed Vicker is a Lecturer in Comparative Education at the Institute of Education, University of London. He taught secondary-school history in Hong Kong English for four years in the 1990s; later he advised the People's Education Press in Beijing on the writing of textbooks. He has recently published 'In Search of an Identity: The Politics of History as a School Subject in Hong Kong, 1960s-2002' (Routledge 2003).


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr Tracey L.D. Lu

Prehistoric Food Culture and Life Ways in South China

29 January 2004 Thursday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Based on archaeological discoveries in recent years and some ethnographic data, this talk focuses on the food culture and life ways in prehistoric South China between approximately 12,000 to 6000 years ago. Prehistoric food ingredients and ways of obtaining the ingredients will be discussed, as well as dwelling styles and social structures as part of the prehistoric culture in South China.

Dr. Tracey L.D. Lu is an archaeologist. She is Assistant Professor at the Anthropology Department of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her current research interests are on prehistoric cultures in South China and Hong Kong, including subsistence strategies, prehistoric food culture, and the origin and development of pottery and textile manufacturing.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr Kinnia Yau

��������k�d���q�v�챴
A Study of Hong Kong, Japanese and Korean Beauty Comedies

13 January 2004 Tuesday 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

�����y�N�|���Q��~�y��󭻴�, �饻�M���ꪺ���k�d���q�v�A�p '�ڪ����Z�k��'�B'�s�Ϯv�f'�B '���J�Юa���Ѩ�'���A�H���Q�U�_���I���Ψ���|�N�q,�q����|����F���b�o�譱�Ҫ�{�����P�C��Q�@�դh �]Dr. Kinnia Yau�^ �O����j�Ǥ饻��s�Ǩt�U�z�б¥D����إ]�A[�������q�v���Y��P���]�M [�q�q�v���R�饻��ƻP���|]�� �C

 
       
   
       

Copyright@2020. All Rights Reserved. Department of Anthropology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.