Archive 2005
     
             
     

THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dan Waters

One Couple, Two Cultures
81 Western-Chinese Couples Talk About Love and Marriage

30 November 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This talk will focus on the research recounted in Dan Waters' recently published book. Up until World War II, Western-Chinese intermarriage was not generally accepted in "polite" society, neither by Europeans nor by Chinese. Today, mixed marriages are common, as Dan Waters himself , with half-a-century of experience, can attest. This lecture will explore questions such as these: In mixed-race marriages, what sort of life styles do couples lead? What kinds of compatibility and communications problems take place? What cuisine do such couples prefer, and how do they bring up their Eurasian children? Can such couples overcome cultural obstacles to lead happy lives together, or is such a thing merely an impossible dream?

Dr Dan Waters is past president of the Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch, and the author of Faces of Hong Kong: An Old Hand's Reflections, and the recently published One Couple, Two Cultures, upon which this talk is based.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Yunxiang Yan

How to Be a Nice But Calculating Person:
Economic Agency and Personhood in Rural North China

2 November 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Taking a close look at a villager's bookkeeping practice, this talk explores how the art of calculating and budgeting (locally known as suanji) is developed in village society. The skill of suanji is intertwined with cultural symbolism in folk accounting, and has to be learned as part of the local culture of reciprocity and moral economy. This shows that economic agency is part of a more complicated process of social practice and that calculating and budgeting are as much cultural as they are economic.

Yunxiang Yan is a professor of anthropology at University of California, Los Angeles.? He is the author of The Flow of Gifts: Reciprocity and Social Networks in a Chinese Village (1996) and Private Life under Socialism: Love, Intimacy, and Family Change in a Chinese Village, 1949-1999 (2003). His current research interests include urban consumerism and the impact of cultural globalization on Chinese society.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Chan Yuet Wah

The Cultural Development of Late Neolithic Sai Kung, Hong Kong

20 October 2005 Thursday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

The rich artifacts recovered from the archaeological site of Sha Ha, Sai Kung mark it as one of the most important prehistoric sites in Hong Kong and the South China area. The manufacturing techniques and functions of stone adzes from Neolithic Sha Ha are explored through research methods of knapping experiments, experimental archaeology and use-wear analysis. Examining this material culture greatly contributes to our understanding of ways of life in Sai Kung in this period.

The researcher, Chan Yuet Wah, is an M.Phil student in the Department of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Geoffrey A. Fowler

Mickey Mao: What the World's Newest Disneyland
Tells Us About Globalization

22 September 2005 Thursday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

The Hong Kong Disneyland opening on September 12 provides a rare window on the role of multinational corporations in the globalization of cultures. How did Disney as a corporation -- famous for selling and spreading Americana -- approach crafting and selling a theme park destined for Chinese consumption? What values might attract Chinese tourists to a Disney park - "American" culture, "global" culture, or something "Chinese"? And what role does the idea of local culture - from feng shui and shark's fin, to Mulan and fireworks -- play in the politics and marketing of the park? This will be one reporter's unofficial view, after hours of interviews with company officials, marketers, and visitors to Hong Kong Disneyland.

Mr. Fowler has been an Asian Wall Street Journal reporter based in Hong Kong since 2002 covering Asian media, marketing, youth and cultural affairs. Before becoming a journalist, Mr. Fowler trained as a social anthropologist, earning a graduate degree in anthropology at Cambridge University and an undergraduate degree in social anthropology and Afro-American studies at Harvard University. He was born in New York City.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Tam Sin Yu Ophelia
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South Asian Students In Primary School: Minorities and Education in Hong Kong

6 July 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

The Education and Manpower Bureau changed the education policy regarding ethnic minorities in Hong Kong in late 2003. According to the new policy, ethnic minorities are no longer guaranteed a seat in schools that instruct in English. A group of South Asian parents formed a concern group to ask for the recommencement of the old policy. How can we understand the policy change and its repercussions in the postcolonial context of Hong Kong? In this talk, the speaker will discuss whether Hong Kong is a multicultural society by analyzing the views of the Bureau, the concern group, and South Asian parents regarding the new policy.

Tam Sin Yu Ophelia is an M.Phil. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

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The Adventures of Japanese Housewives in Hong Kong

16 June 2005 Thursday 7: 00pm

Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall Ground Floor <> 100 Chatham Road South

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Japanese women are popularly viewed as passive, selfless and dedicated completely to their husbands and families. Japanese expatriate wives seem to fit this picture. However, studies show that women are undergoing a quiet revolution in Japan. Life is becoming more diverse, and women are emphasizing their individuality in career, marriage and meanings in life. How are these changes affecting Japanese housewives in Hong Kong? Are Japanese housewives really so passive? How are they adapting to life in Hong Kong? What problems do they face when they return to Japan?

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Ms. Lam Wing Sze is an MPhil Candidate, in the Department of Japanese Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Maggi Leung, Janet Salaff & Maria Tam

"The grass is greener..."
The lives and struggles of Chinese migrant families

21 April 2005 Thursday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This discussion is presented by three scholars who have been doing research on Chinese migrant families; from different perspectives, they try to understand how families adapt to living in multiple locales. Maggi Leung will explore how members of transnational families work out their love, care and duties towards their parents, spouses, children and other kin members despite the physical distance between them. Janet Salaff will talk about PRC men and women immigrants to Toronto: how they lose their place on the career ladder after emigration, and struggle, transnationally to maintain family life, while finding new meaning in Canadian familism and "my homism." Based on her interviews with wives, husbands, and children, and mistresses. Maria Tam will discuss concepts of responsibility and family membership among people involved in "mistressing" across the Hong Kong-China border, and will discuss family as cultural ideology and as social practice.

Maggi Leung is a social geographer working at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, who has researched Chinese migration in Europe, as well as, more recently, transnational families. Janet Salaff is a sociologist at the University of Toronto who has studied Chinese family economies for many years; currently she looks at migration as a family issue in Chinese families. Maria Tam is an anthropologist at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, engaging in research on cultural identity in relation to gender, work, and mobility; her recent project is on polygynous relations across the Hong Kong-China border.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

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New Religions in Hong Kong: Phenomenon and Interpretation

13 April 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm

Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall Ground Floor <> 100 Chatham Road South

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Besides traditional religions, a variety of new religions flourish in Hong Kong. Due to biased media coverage, many people see new religions as evil cults. Researchers, however, take a more neutral view. From a sociological perspective, this talk will discuss the following: What are new religions? How can we understand the emergence and development of new religions? What do new religions tell us about cultural and social changes in Hong Kong?

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Dr. Chan Shun Hing is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion and Philosophy, Hong Kong Baptist University. He specializes in the sociology of religion and religions in Hong Kong.


The Barbara E. Ward Memorial Lecture


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Prof. David Faure

Wanderings in the Last Millennium of Chinese Society

31 March 2005 Thursday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This talk by David Faure, renowned social historian who believes that Chinese history has to be written not only from books but also from remains on the ground, considers what he has learned about Chinese society from his research and travels over several decades. This talk will explore how Chinese society has changed in the past thousand years in the ways in which local society is structured, and in the ways in which local society has related to the state. The talk will also consider the broader underlying question of how local people became Chinese.

David Faure started out his professional career as a historian by studying the history of the New Territories. He expanded from that to the history of the Pearl River delta, and, more recently, to other parts of China. He has written and edited numerous books, including The Structure of Chinese Rural Society: Lineage and Village in the Eastern New Territories, Hong Kong (1986), Colonialism and the Hong Kong Mentality (2003), and Emperor and Ancestor: State and Lineage in South China (in press). He is currently Chair of the Department of History at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He worked with Barbara Ward and knew her well in the years before her death.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Dr. Li Siu Leung

Cross-Dressing in Chinese Culture

14 March 2005 Monday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This talk will examine the representations of cross-dressers in Chinese culture from the imperial times to the modern era. The cultural meanings of various discourses on cross-dressing will be discussed with special reference to gender and sexuality. Emphasis will be put on the practice of cross-dressing in Chinese opera, especially the female impersonator (the "male-dan").

Li Siu Leung is associate professor in the Department of Cultural Studies at Lingnan University, Hong Kong. He received his PhD in comparative literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and was Joukowsky postdoctoral fellow at Brown University. His academic publications include Cross-Dressing in Chinese Opera (HKU Press, 2003). Also trained in European classical music and flute performance, Li is a flute player and collects late nineteenth century French flutes as a hobby.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Frank Dikotter

Material Culture and Everyday Life in Modern China

21 Feb 2005 Monday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

This talk explores the transformation of everyday life in China from roughly 1870 to 1949 by decoding the changing cultural meanings and social uses of a whole variety of 'new' objects, from electric fans, gramophones, running water, walking sticks and leather shoes in wealthy households, to the matches, rubber galoshes and cement floors in the farmer's hovel.

Frank Dikotter is Professor of the Modern History of China at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and currently Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong. He has published six books, including The Discourse of Race in Modern China, and Sex, Culture and Modernity in China. His last book is entitled Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Maximilian Holland

Primates and People: What Can Primates Teach Us about Being Human?

16 Feb 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

In recent years primatologists have accumulated a mass of information about the behaviour of non-human primates. Traditional anthropological views of humanity are founded on perspectives which predate primatological research. To what extent can anthropology now benefit from our increasing knowledge of primate lives?

Dr. Maximilian Holland obtained his Ph.D. in social anthropological theory from the London School of Economics in 2004. He currently lectures in Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His current research concerns theoretical synthesis across disciplines in our understanding of social bonding.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

NG Wai Ming

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JAPANESE PORNOGRAPHIC FILMS IN HONG KONG

24 Jan 2005 Monday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

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Hong Kong's movie industry has been under the spell of Japanese sex culture for quite some time. Unlike kung fu, gangster and comedy films, Hong Kong erotic films have received little media and scholarly attention. This talk will outline the history of Japanese erotic films in Hong Kong and discusses the genre's impact. It will highlight the interplay between "Japanization" and localization in Asian popular culture.

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Benjamin Wai-ming Ng received his Ph.D. from Princeton University. He is Associate Professor of Japanese Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, teaching and researching Japanese popular culture and Japan-Hong Kong relations.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Gilles Guiheux

FROM THE SHARDS OF BROKEN RICE BOWLS TO PETTY CAPITALISM

19 Jan 2005 Wednesday 7: 00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History

Former planned economy workers in Yiyang near Changsha in Hunan Province now run private enterprises in the very places they once worked under the old state enterprise system. Based on extensive field research and interviews, this lecture will examine the economic forms, relationships and networks that have emerged on a neighbourhood level, what connection they have with the past and what hint they may offer of the future in a fast developing Chinese economy.

Gilles Guiheux is Senior Lecturer at the University of Artois (Arras, France), Director of the French Centre for Research on Contemporary China (Centre d'etudes francais sur la Chine contemporaine, CEFC) in Hong Kong and chief editor of Perspectives chinoises and China Perspectives. He specializes in business history and economic sociology of contemporary China.

 
       
   
       

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