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THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Chaung Wing-yee, Gloria

Slow Media in the Viral Age: Urban Renewal and Community Organization in Hong Kong

Friday 17 January 2020, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

"Wedding Card Street" is what a number of people will think of if we are to talk about urban renewal in Hong Kong. Since the redevelopment of Lee Tung Street, there have been numerous urban renewal projects going on. How is gentrification experienced and lived? This talk is about an ethnographic study of how "gentrification" is experienced, lived, talked about, and "mediated" by local residents, shopkeepers in old districts of Hong Kong and a local concern group, an old district autonomy advancement group. This group of people, with their conscious, participatory, reflexive and creative "slow media" practice, showed that media can be an artistic creation, that its life, from its production/generation to circulation(s), can "weave" imaginations into reality.

Chaung Wing-yee Gloria, is a Mphil student and undergraduate in the Department of Anthropology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.


THE HONG KONG ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY
AND THE HONG KONG MUSEUM OF HISTORY
PRESENT

An Anthropological Talk by Tung-Yi Kho

In Search of the Good Life in Contemporary China: Stories from Shenzhen

Friday 7 February 2020, 7:00pm
Hong Kong Museum of History
Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui

What makes a good life in China today? In the past thirty-plus years, China sustained a historically unprecedented economic growth rate that averaged roughly 10% annually, lifting over 800 million of its population out of poverty. In line with these trends, urbanization proceeded apace throughout the country, precipitated by largescale rural-urban migration. Such radical economic and demographic transformation of an historically agrarian civilisation has led to talk of a civilisation-switch that has been widely hailed as a success-story. But have these coeval meta-level processes of modernization, implied by economic progress, yielded the good life? Shenzhen was Kho's field-site of choice for 24 months of ethnographic research because it was the PRC's first Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and, also, its most successful. His interlocutors were all rural-migrants who had come to Shenzhen in search of the supposedly good life. Did they find it? His research sought to find out and in the process, shedding light on the nature of modernity and our prospects of attaining the good life within it.

Tung-Yi Kho is an adjunct professor in CUHK's Department of Anthropology and a scholar of modern China, with PhDs in Social Anthropology (SOAS) and in Cultural Studies (Lingnan University).

 
         
         
         
       

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